1. The stereotype of the historic and folkloric witch has perpetual appeal, a visual package that entertains and frightens equally. Witches are everywhere: in books, dramas, pageants, and advertising; they inspire jokes, dreams, fables, similes, and metaphors. We never tire of reviving and reinventing them.
    - Free chapter from Witchcraft: A Very Short Introduction (VSIs Online) plus more interesting facts on the origins of Halloween and the symbolic meaning of witches. (via oupacademic)

    (via oupacademic)

  2. peabodywunderkammer:



Vivisection Sewing!!!!!
Obviously, these women are busily sewing the rest of their bodies based on patterns, of course, from Godey’s Ladies’ Book. More seriously, even regrettably, as implied in the illustrations, both proper and improper sewing techniques are ultimately hazardous to your health. Does the sewing machine require a corporeal sacrifice in order to create the latest frock coat?  Are these grotesques foretelling a future Dr. Who villain?  Is this what used to happen in the former warehouses of Baltimore’s Station North? Only the thread of time will tell! MWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!
How to Ruin Your Health with the Sewing Machine by a Physician. Baltimore: Turnbull Brothers, 1874.Call No. 613.6 P578Location: George Peabody Library

    peabodywunderkammer:

    Vivisection Sewing!!!!!

    Obviously, these women are busily sewing the rest of their bodies based on patterns, of course, from Godey’s Ladies’ Book. More seriously, even regrettably, as implied in the illustrations, both proper and improper sewing techniques are ultimately hazardous to your health. Does the sewing machine require a corporeal sacrifice in order to create the latest frock coat?  Are these grotesques foretelling a future Dr. Who villain?  Is this what used to happen in the former warehouses of Baltimore’s Station North? Only the thread of time will tell! MWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

    How to Ruin Your Health with the Sewing Machine by a Physician. Baltimore: Turnbull Brothers, 1874.

    Call No. 613.6 P578
    Location: George Peabody Library

  3. defunctfashion:

Madame Percy | c. 1910


In the early 20th century, cultivated women regarded pastels and muted shades as refined and “lady-like,” while bright colors seemed “vulgar.” Tastes would soon change, and after about 1910, vivid colors increasingly came into fashion. This aqua silk, however, is still muted by a layer of black net and ivory lace.

    defunctfashion:

    Madame Percy | c. 1910

    In the early 20th century, cultivated women regarded pastels and muted shades as refined and “lady-like,” while bright colors seemed “vulgar.” Tastes would soon change, and after about 1910, vivid colors increasingly came into fashion. This aqua silk, however, is still muted by a layer of black net and ivory lace.
  4. I am reading Madness, Rack, and Honey by Mary Ruefle, and it is great. It is so readable, and I love her meditations. She has made me want to tear through the NYTimes archives to find the one that came out in celebration of the 1969 moon landing. I am realizing how wonderful it must have been to see pictures of Earth for the first time from space, and that this was in my parents’ lifetime, and so they experienced it when they were children. I wonder if it compares to being alive when the first sheep was cloned. I don’t think cloning a sheep has the same majesty.

  5. mdhsphotographs:

    Pompeiian Fete
    Greenmount Avenue and North Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 
    1890
    Quartley’s Gallery
    Cabinet card
    Subject Vertical File (Baltimore - Festivals)
    Maryland Historical Society
    [SVF]

    The Pompeiian Fete was a recreation of the fall of Pompeii, staged in a park at Greenmount Avenue and North Avenue. The park was called the fairgrounds because it held many fairs and circuses. 

    Google Maps Street View of the area today: 


    View Larger Map

  6. tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1861, [ambrotype portrait of Confederate Private Japhet Collins, brandishing a pistol and a knife]
via Southern Methodist Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library, Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs

I love that his name is Japhet. No one is named Japhet now. Did I see that name in D’Aulaire’s book of Greek myths?

    tuesday-johnson:

    ca. 1861, [ambrotype portrait of Confederate Private Japhet Collins, brandishing a pistol and a knife]

    via Southern Methodist Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library, Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs

    I love that his name is Japhet. No one is named Japhet now. Did I see that name in D’Aulaire’s book of Greek myths?

  7. The Great Baltimore Fire from 137 West Lanvale Street, 1904 by Mary Dorsey Davis, 1904. From the Maryland Digital Cultural Heritage Project, part of EPFL.

    The Great Baltimore Fire from 137 West Lanvale Street, 1904 by Mary Dorsey Davis, 1904. From the Maryland Digital Cultural Heritage Project, part of EPFL.

  8. todaysdocument:

“Shacks, put up by the Bonus Army on the Anacostia flats, Washington, D.C., burning after the battle with the military. The Capitol in the background. 1932.”
In the summer of 1932, in the midst of the Great Depression, World War I veterans seeking early payment of a bonus scheduled for 1945 assembled in Washington to pressure Congress and the White House. After the Senate rejected the bonus, most of the protesters went home, but a core of ten thousand members of the “Bonus Army” remained behind, many with their families. On the morning of July 28, violence erupted between the protesters and police, and President Hoover reluctantly sent in federal troops under Maj. Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Ignoring the President’s order for restraint, the flamboyant general drove the tattered protesters from the city and violently cleared their Anacostia campsite.

Holy schnikeys.

    todaysdocument:

    “Shacks, put up by the Bonus Army on the Anacostia flats, Washington, D.C., burning after the battle with the military. The Capitol in the background. 1932.”

    In the summer of 1932, in the midst of the Great Depression, World War I veterans seeking early payment of a bonus scheduled for 1945 assembled in Washington to pressure Congress and the White House. After the Senate rejected the bonus, most of the protesters went home, but a core of ten thousand members of the “Bonus Army” remained behind, many with their families. On the morning of July 28, violence erupted between the protesters and police, and President Hoover reluctantly sent in federal troops under Maj. Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Ignoring the President’s order for restraint, the flamboyant general drove the tattered protesters from the city and violently cleared their Anacostia campsite.

    Holy schnikeys.

  9. mdhsphotographs:

Baltimore Bicycle ClubBaltimore, Marylandca. 1898Photographer unknownLarge Photographs CollectionMaryland Historical Society[Accession 63054] 

Wow, back when bicycling was tantamount to water skiing, in a way. 

    mdhsphotographs:

    Baltimore Bicycle Club
    Baltimore, Maryland
    ca. 1898
    Photographer unknown
    Large Photographs Collection
    Maryland Historical Society
    [Accession 63054] 

    Wow, back when bicycling was tantamount to water skiing, in a way.